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CONFERENCE PROGRAM

All sessions available on-demand until May 8, 2021

Certificates of Attendance issued for all completed sessions

NOTE: ALL TIMES LISTED ARE CENTRAL STANDARD TIME (CST)

Tuesday, December 8, 2020

Opening Keynote

8:00 AM
Opening Keynote: Mission, Metrics and Vision

Nearly 50 years ago the seminal document America Burning was published, forging the mission, metrics and vision for the fire service we know today. As we approach the half century anniversary we must pause to take stock of our progress, evaluate our current environment and identify future potential. The success of our last 50 years has been a dramatic reduction in the number of fires; the potential consequence is rising complacency. Join us for a deep discussion on how we recalibrate our mission and our metrics today to support the a vision of vigilance going forward for our service.  

Speaker:

Brian Brush

General Sessions

8:00 AM
A New Chief's Guide to Surviving Local Politics

Newly promoted chief officers are often well versed in the strategies, tactics, and operations of their departments. With their new positions come the added responsibility of becoming the “face” of their agency. The focus is on the formal and informal politics that a newly promoted chief officer must be ready to encounter, navigate, and engage upon. This interactive presentation will discuss how politics impact not only the internal stakeholders, but also the external stakeholders. Emphasis will be placed on the attitude, practices and steps that the new chief can take to avoid mayhem and survive local politics.

Speaker:

Jared Renshaw
Are Millennials Really the Problem?

This class will involve real case studies on mentoring and its effect on our youth. It will be interactive and action-packed as the presenter describes the trials, tribulations and celebrations of mentoring.

Speaker:

Jacob Johnson
Blocker Rigs: Traffic Management Apparatus

Working traffic accidents is extremely dangerous for first responders. With major highways running through busy cities, numerous accidents occur daily. Following a horrifically close call for three Irving, TX, firefighters in 2015, Chief Victor Conley developed a lifesaving, cost-cutting plan—the blocker program. He repurposed retired fire apparatus, retrofitting them and using them as blockers—the first line of protection for fire, EMS, police and wrecker operators on accident scenes.

Speaker:

Creating a Psychologically Healthy Fire Department

This course from the National Volunteer Fire Council and the American Psychological Association's Center for Organizational Excellence is designed to empower fire department leadership to promote and support their departments. Based on the framework from the Psychologically Healthy Fire Departments initiative, this course focuses on six key practices—member involvement, health and safety, member growth and development, work-life balance, member recognition, and effective communication—to facilitate member well-being and department functioning. This will help leadership become better equipped to recognize, mitigate, and support behavioral health issues within departments while overcoming cultural stigmas that have plagued the fire/EMS service for far too long.

Speaker:

David Ballard
Electric and Autonomous Vehicles

During this University of Extrication presentation, the presenter will look at the challenges that exist for responders dealing with crashes or fires involving electric vehicles (EVs) and autonomous vehicles (AVs). This multi-media program utilizes case studies from around the world to illustrate what lies in store for responders next time they encounter an EV or AV. 

Speaker:

Ron Moore
Engine Company Search

Life Safety is the number one priority of the fire service, typically accomplished by searching for victims inside fire buildings. The best thing an engine company can do to save lives is to stretch a line and extinguish the fire, however this alone does not locate and remove victims. In this session, the presenter reveals a plan for departments with limited staffing to accomplish both of these important tasks. This is NOT an ideal situation, as separate crews will always be faster and more efficient, but this class is designed for those engine companies operating without support apparatus that need to accomplish both tasks.

Speaker:

Robert C. Owens Sr.
Evaluation and Care of the TASERed

This class will cover the design and function of the TASER. The presenter will examine medically documented injuries and treatments and explore the concepts of extreme agitation and excited delirium.

Speaker:

Robert Lowe
Fire Operations in High-Rise and Large-Area Structures

In this session, various elements of fire protection systems are translated "to the street" for firefighters and company officers. Significant knowledge of standpipe and sprinkler systems, fire pumps, fire alarm control panels, and other building safety features is often reserved for fire prevention or code enforcement personnel. Attendees will gain an understanding of complex fire protection system components that will enable them to apply the easy-to-remember principles on working incidents. Attendees are also guided in developing a realistic company-level pre-incident planning program. Case studies involving LODDs and high-dollar-loss fires that occurred in buildings despite fire protection systems being in place are also examined.

Speaker:

Brad French
First Due: The First Five Minutes

In this session, the presenters will explore the “bread-and-butter” operations of the first-due engine company and how everyone’s role supports and builds upon the others. The presenters will look at size-up and the survivability profile; water supply and handline placement; whether to go traditional, transitional, or defensive and a whole lot more. Both strategic and tactical considerations will be considered throughout the discussion. The program will be presented in an interactive and engaging manner, emphasizing best practices and using high-impact case studies.

Speaker:

John Brophy
From the Rig to the Roof: Ventilation Principles & Practices

The two most important tasks to be carried out at the scene of a house fire are the fire attack and the search for trapped civilians. The quicker we accomplish ventilation, the quicker companies can get water on the fire and conduct search and rescue operations. How the roof team goes about carrying out this task is risky and needs to be a well-choreographed dance that addresses two main things—ensuring we effectively and timely vent the structure, and ensuring the safety of the roof team throughout the operation. The presenters will address the above and attendees will leave with an effective roof operation.

Speakers:

Go Beneath the Surface: Learning to Develop Your People from the Inside Out

Drawn from his Human Domain Operators Course specifically developed for Special Operations Forces, the presenter unpacks and uncovers all aspects of the human domain and provides actionable processes for advancing training, leadership and organizational development. The objective of this session is to provide the individual and company the tools and insights necessary to develop individual skills, internal team strengths, and external capabilities to influence the operational environment.

Speaker:

Jeff Banman
Leadership from the Bottom Up!

This fun and engaging leadership class is designed to inspire, educate and motivate attendees on how to help yourself, each other and your organization, all while rekindling your spirit! Attendees, from firefighters to fire chiefs, will walk away with valuable information on enhancing individual and organizational performance. Let go of things not in your control (negative narrative) before they pull you down. Your passion, thoughts, feelings and behavior are in your control! Leaders typically work their way up from the bottom and never forget where they came from. All organizations have issues and now is your time to be part of the solution.

Speaker:

Candace Ashby
Lessons Learned: Calumet Water Reclamation Plant Explosion and Building Collapse

In this presentation, the presenter will share the lessons learned following the August 2018 explosion and collapse at a southside Chicago plant. As Chief of Special Operations at the time of the response, and responsible for overall command on scene, the presenter will provide direct details on the timeline of events that resulted in the successful rescue of a civilian plant employee. The presentation will connect this success to the impact of technical rescue training on the responding companies.

Speaker:

Tim Walsh
Lessons Learned: Jackson Memorial Middle School Shooting

On Feb. 20, 2018, Jackson Memorial Middle School in Ohio was the site of a fatal self-inflicted shooting involving a 13-year-old male student. This immediately made the middle school, and all local campuses, go into lockdown. Fire, EMS and law enforcement agencies converged on the scene. The initial intelligence reported that this was the first step in a planned mass shooting. The event went from a suicide to a large-scale operation. This class will explain the course of events of handling the school shooting emergency. Lessons learned will be examined, with each layer of the event, as they unfolded.

Speaker:

Kai Rieger
Medical Director Nightmares

The role of a medical director at an EMS agency is varied and plentiful. Often it is rewarding and fulfilling, but at times it can stray into the bizarre and soul-crushing. Come learn some of the bizarre, real-world scenarios that have challenged medical directors and how they successfully—or not so successfully—managed them. Engage and learn on scenarios both funny and frankly unbelievable, while learning how this essential role can help your department achieve success in daily operations.

Speakers:

John Casey
Rescuer Near Misses and Using Live People for Rescue Training

We should always have full control over training, but even the best plans have risks. If we look at some of the near-miss investigations, we see that many of these incidents were, in fact, preventable. This program will discuss factors to be considered when using live “victims” during training, modifying a training plan, writing a lesson plan for success and more. Attendees will be able to take back the lessons learned to their own department and review their operating policies and procedures and make sound recommendations.

Speaker:

Christopher Feder
Staying Aggressively Positive

How can anyone hate going to the firehouse? It might be because of the people found inside. Sometimes we let our opinions and thoughts get in the way of our chosen profession. One way to fix that is to stay aggressively positive. In this highly interactive session, the presenter will dive into the why, how, and where firefighters can focus their attention to stay positive around the firehouse. How can you deal with the downers while building your circle of influence? This session will engage all the attendees to participate in a fluid, non-scripted discussion.

Speaker:

Ryan Pennington
Taming the Tigers of Transition

The decision to go from an all-volunteer to a combination-type system is often a difficult one. The road to success is riddled with pitfalls and obstacles most every step of the way. Learn from a fire department leader who was in the trenches during the worst of times struggling through the transition. While there is no “cookie cutter” solution to all transition-related issues, this class will provide you with a vast array of examples of which tactics work, as well as which ones do not, should your department find itself trying to tame the tigers of transition.

Speaker:

James Jester
The Art of Reading Smoke: The Next Generation

Today's structure fires are more hostile than ever before. The heat release rates and fire growth currently encountered are unparalleled in fire service history. It is imperative for first-arriving firefighters, officers, and chief officers to rapidly read and recognize the fire's location, progression, and future before committing personnel to the interior. This session brings a new library of videos, new research, and a frank discussion on cancer risks and prevention to build intellectually aggressive firefighters. Consistently reviewed as "the best class I have ever taken," this session cannot be missed!

Speaker:

Rob Backer
The Company Officer as an Instructor

An effective company officer is the keystone to operational success. This high-energy class will provide fire officers with various instructor resources and training ideas that are geared toward informal, company-based daily drills. With these elements, officers can more effectively reinforce skill competence and develop an intimate familiarity of their company’s first-due response district. Session attendees will leave re-energized to take their company-level training to new heights. If you want to make positive changes in your organization, officer development is where it starts.

Speaker:

Brad French
The Paradigm Shift in Wellness Best Practices for Fire Recruits

As the fire service continues to develop and evolve, a shift towards emphasizing wellness and training as a whole has been identified. Based upon five years of data and observation, predictors for future recruit performance have been identified and guided our program development. These traits have led to the creation and implementation of repeatable and analyzable fitness testing, a comprehensive injury prevention program, and influenced hiring and retention standards for recruits better aligned with NFPA 1582. This paradigm shift towards prioritizing wellness at the recruit level allows for a strong foundation translating into measurable department wide changes.

Speakers:

Mackey Hermosillo
Working Outside on the First-Due Truck

Do you want to get some hands-on experience, working as an exterior crew, on the first-due truck? In this class, the presenter will cover riding positions, ground ladders, ventilation, truck positioning, and vertical ventilation on residential structures. The presenter will use mid-mount platforms and tiller trucks in this class and explain some of the benefits of both trucks.

Speaker:

Sexton Towns
9:15 AM
Changing the Outcome of Our Neighborhood Stroke Patient

Fire departments in Columbus, OH, partnered on the revolutionary and innovative Mobile Stroke Treatment Unit (MSTU), which was launched on May 29, 2019. Among mobile stroke programs throughout the country, the Columbus unit is among busiest units, responding to more than 2,000 calls of CVA in the first year and transporting nearly 450 patients. Treating these patients on an average 26 minutes faster than the emergency department, the MSTU program provides a view of what the future view of how prehospital and hospital providers could provide the powerful treatments and therapies at a local and community level.

Speaker:

Nathan Jennings
Command Success

Speaker:

Curt Isakson
Courage Under Fire Leadership: 10 Commandments of a Great Fire Officer!

This session is intended for fire service professionals of all ranks (especially current and future fire officers) who are open to suggestions for improvement and best practices. Sadly, many personnel of all ranks (especially officers) are just calling it in or have “retired in place.” Attendees will be exposed to the 10 Commandments to inspire them to be the best they can be. Areas discussed include but are not limited to leadership, officer development, customer service, team building, emergency scene operations, mentoring and succession planning. It takes true “courage” to be a leader in today’s fire service – do you have what it takes?

Speaker:

Steve Prziborowski
Developing Today's Truck Company Culture

A well-established truck company culture creates the foundation for effective truck company operations on the fireground. Both are mentally and physically demanding and require members to be technically proficient for success at fire scenes. This presentation will give you a thorough knowledge of truck company operations and the necessary tools and equipment to accomplish coordinated fireground operations to effectively carry out life-saving tasks.

Speaker:

Sean Eagen
Getting the Most Out of Your Recruit Training Program

The most influential time in any new firefighter’s career is the first months they are with your organization. You only have a short time during the recruit academy to set the foundation that will either become a storied career, or a 30-year drain on your department. Organizing and running a top shelf program takes a lot of effort before, during, and after the students leave the building, but a successful recruit academy is the bedrock of a successful department. This class will help the attendee identify what makes a successful recruit program and the tools needed to sustain the academy.

Speaker:

Keith Niemann
Leading with Labor: A Cooperative Approach to Advance the Fire Service

All too often the idea of fire service labor/management relations brings to mind contentious arguments and petty departmental feuds. Attendees will gain better understanding of not only the value of a strong working relationship between labor and management, but they will also learn and discuss ways to improve existing dynamics at their agency. A strong labor/management relationship fosters a more productive and safer environment for firefighters and the citizens they are sworn to protect. This interactive session will challenge conventional thinking and motivate fire service leaders of all ranks to make the best job in the world even better.

Speaker:

Lithium-ion Battery Systems and Firefighter Safety

On April 19, 2019, four firefighters received serious injuries as a result of cascading thermal runaway within a lithium-ion battery energy system that led to a deflagration event. This presentation will review recent lithium-ion battery testing, a developed test methodology to evaluate energy storage systems and how these interact with the contributing factors and subsequent recommendations issued in an effort to reduce the risk of a repeat event. The presenters will also review current testing that is scheduled in the interim.

Speaker:

Sean DeCrane
Rescue Me: Strategies and Tactics for Employee Fires

Most fire officers and chiefs will fight more fires in the station then they will out in the streets. This program will utilize basic fireground terminology to break down and make sense of employee coaching, counseling and disciplinary procedures. The presenter will also focus on using fire prevention, education, pre-planning and fire behavior recognition training (reading smoke) to prevent fires (problems) and keep them small. The presenters will also compare hostile fire events, such as rapid-fire progression, flashover, backdraft and smoke explosions, to the more difficult personnel issues. The course will conclude with several “fire simulations” using video and role-player scenarios.

Speaker:

Jesse Quinalty
Response to Civil Unrest

Incidents of civil unrest can happen in any jurisdiction, at any time, for a multitude of reasons. Civil unrest, or civil disturbance, is defined as “acts of violence and disorder detrimental to the public law and order. It includes acts such as riots, acts of violence, insurrections, unlawful obstructions or assemblages. It also includes all domestic conditions requiring or likely to require the use of federal armed forces.” Departments must alter their standard policies, procedures, and mindsets to safely and effectively respond to these incidents. Attendees will examine building construction features, occupancy types, scene security, fireground hazards, strategies and tactics, and past responses.

Speaker:

Jonathan Hall
Roof Member Rescue/Mayday

The two most important tasks to be carried out at the scene of a house fire are the fire attack and the search for trapped civilians. The quicker we accomplish ventilation, the quicker companies can get water on the fire and conduct search and rescue operations. How the roof team goes about carrying out this task is risky and needs to be a well-choreographed dance that addresses two main things—ensuring we effectively and timely vent the structure, and ensuring the safety of the roof team throughout the operation. The presenters will address the above and attendees will leave with an effective roof operation.

Speakers:

Shaping Your Volunteer Fire Department to Fit Today's Expectations

Is your volunteer department struggling to maintain relevance in our changing society? Does your current service delivery model meet the needs and expectations of your community? Are you struggling to recruit, train, and retain members? There seems to be a nationwide panic about the critical shortage of volunteers. Does it have to be this way? In this class, the presenters will examine how industry and society trends impact today’s volunteer fire service, taking a hard look at the way we've always done it, as well as sharing and developing alternative ways to recruit, market, lead, train and manage our departments and members.

Speaker:

Brandon Fletcher
The Contemporary Fire Problem: Lightweight Multi-Unit Residential Complexes

The intensified market for affordable housing and urban “downtown” residential living space has led to the increased construction of large-scale townhouse and multi-unit residential complexes in both urban and suburban environments. The lightweight materials and pre-engineered methods used to construct these developments, along with other inherent design weaknesses (such as limited access and egress, inadequate sprinkler protection, pedestal construction, exposure hazards, and significant life-safety issues), present unique fire suppression and incident command challenges. This dynamic training program will take an in-depth look at these hazards while providing valuable fireground information concerning size-up, plan review, incident management, pre-planning, and fire suppression strategy and tactics.

Speakers:

Robert Moran
9:45 AM
Measuring Success of Your EMS System

In this session, participants will review the pertinent quality parameters and patient outcome variables that are essential for developing an impactful EMS continuous quality improvement (CQI) program. The session will focus on time-critical diagnoses (cardiac arrest, STEMI, stroke, trauma and sepsis), high-risk patient encounters, the dispatch process, and unique EMS roles (community paramedicine, naloxone distribution programs, vaccine administration). Participants will also review methods for collecting variables, analyzing data, implementing process changes and performing reassessments.

Speaker:

11:00 AM
Real World ECGs

ECGs are an increasingly utilized during pre-hospital intervention with an ever-increasing list of indications. Interpretation can be a challenge in the best of conditions, let alone the uncontrolled scene response. Patient movement, electrical noise, movement artifact and other challenges (i.e., diaphoresis and chest hair) can make for less than perfect ECGs that then need to be interpreted. Once all that could be corrected has been fixed—it’s time to dig in and give a read. This course will challenge even the savviest paramedic and demonstrate tips, tricks and tools for getting all the information that can be garnered from ECGs.

Speakers:

John Casey
12:00 PM
PPE Purchasing Committee

Speaker:

Tech Rescue Tool Showcase

Speaker:

Mike Daley
1:00 PM
Apparatus Operators Role in a Safe & Efficient Fireground

This interactive class is about setting clear expectations for the driver operator on the fireground. With manpower shortages facing most fire service agencies in the country, it is vital to have an all-hands-on-deck approach to fireground tasks for the safety of our members and the public we serve. This class looks at fireground support task that can be completed by the driver operator outside the IDLH space. These tasks will improve the safety and efficiency of the company. An efficient fireground relies on all players to be highly trained and highly engaged in the incident.

Speaker:

Brian Gettemeier
Developing Safe and Effective Fireground Operations

In this session the presenters will look at a program that has been developed to re-envision firefighter training and performance from the ground up. This process, which can easily be based off your department protocols, district, and staffing, will use a continuous improvement mindset to take firefighters from task-level skillset development and ‘pre-mortems’ to effective fireground operations and thorough after-action reviews. Its modular design not only allows you to adapt the program to fit your structure and needs, but allows for ongoing evaluation of the program’s effectiveness. And its street-level feel creates buy-in from firefighters and officers at all levels.

Speaker:

Brian Bastinelli
Fireground Operations Inside Hoarding Conditions

Immediately identifying, adjusting and attacking fires that occur inside buildings cluttered with years of content is essential for victim rescue and firefighter safety. Firefighters of all levels should be aware of the cues and clues of a serenely cluttered environment and how to adjust tactics to reduce the chance of firefighter injury and victim rescue. The chances of firefighters operating inside hoarding conditions is increasing and so should firefighter education on battling fires in hoarding conditions.

Speaker:

Ryan Pennington
No Excuses: Tactics for the Understaffed Department

Many fire departments are understaffed, but that is no excuse not to be prepared. If you have items such as thermal imaging cameras, piercing nozzles, and high-flow/low-pressure hoselines, you must use them to their fullest potential. The presenter will discuss building a tactical playbook for your response. Just as a quarterback will read a defense to ensure the play called meets the situation, your playbook sets expectations but allows responders to pick the best tactic or “play” for the current conditions. Attendees will gain a greater understanding of how to develop tactical options that fit in the context of the understaffed department.

Speaker:

Joey Baxa
Riding Shotgun

This presentation takes an in-depth look at the roles and responsibilities of riding the right front seat on and off the fireground. Often, firefighters are not aware of the expectations that come along with this position. Many believe riding shotgun only deals with decisions while on the scene of emergencies. This is only one small part of a larger responsibility as the company officer. Company officers need to understand that not only will they be fire officers, but they become parental figures, coaches, counselors, and much more to their crew.

Speaker:

Timothy S. Cowan
San Antonio Fire Department Fighting the Opioid Epidemic

In America, more than 100 people die every day from an opioid-related drug overdose. The San Antonio Fire Department Mobil Integrated Health (MIH) Division has developed and deployed two distinct programs to address the opioid crisis. The first program provides community education, Narcan kits, and harm reduction education with great success. The second program addresses the need for an opioid dependence referral process for those seeking treatment, which allows MIH to start immediate medication assisted recovery in the patient’s home with the administration of buprenorphine titrated to symptom control, while awaiting placement in an outpatient treatment center.

Speaker:

Christopher Winckler
Solar Energy and the Fire Service

This class is designed to shift the paradigm in thinking towards a more proactive strategic approach to managing highly complex and dangerous solar energy emergencies not routinely faced by everyday emergency response personnel. Many hidden dangers, such as hazmat battery storage units and excessive building construction weight, is compounded with the addition of solar energy systems. This course provides the answers needed to be more effective in dealing with these dangers and more.

Speaker:

Jeff Simpson
The Search Reformation

This class examines the three key components of a successful search—leadership, the training division and the personnel. Attendees will examine proven skills, debunk myths and review case studies and video of victim rescues involving the use of thermal imaging. Attendees will take part in an interactive multimedia lecture, including multiple case studies, fireground thermal imaging camera video, and helmet-cam footage. Examples, videos and guidelines will be presented and discussed in an attempt to reinforce proven concepts for introduction and continual upkeep of a department’s aggressive search mindset.

Speaker:

Dustin Martinez
Utilizing Data to Justify Organizational Growth

How do you convince the decision-makers to which you report that you need additional staff, funding, or equipment to carry out your organization's mission? Multiple examples are used from the presenter's own department in which he has been able to facilitate almost doubling the number of employees while generating an additional $1 million in EMS revenue annually. Attendees will be shown why knowing your audience and developing personal relationships with your city manager, city councilors, mayor, or other decision-making bodies are key to successful funding requests.

Speaker:

Allen Lewis
1:30 PM
Advanced Medical Devices in Your Community

More and more individuals in your community are being discharged from hospitals with short-term and long-term medical devices that provide life-support and other critical functions. In this session, participants will review advanced medical devices that are increasing in prevalence in the out-of-hospital setting. The session will highlight left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), external defibrillation/cardioversion devices (i.e., Life Vest), continuous infusions of medications for pulmonary hypertension, portable extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) devices, and tracheostomies/mechanical ventilators. Participants will develop a concise approach for troubleshooting and managing these devices.

Speaker:

Are You Command Capable?

Starting with an interactive discussion focusing on how the attendees arrived at being “Command Capable” the instructors will concentrate on presenting a top ten list of the most critical operational elements necessary to establish, sustain, and command a safe and effective fire suppression operation. Topics to be discussed include size-up, decision making, command structure, building construction, communications, accountability, and strategy and tactics. This class is open to current fire officers and any firefighter who may take on the responsibility of sitting in the front officer’s seat of their apparatus!

Speakers:

Robert Moran
Brass Tax: Determining a True Value of Your Agency

This presentation revolves around the SCILL Equation, a formula that combines commonly found data (protected property values, ISO savings per grade, operational budgets, and local millage rates) with industry standards to determine how much a fire department is worth in honest dollars to their community before they turn a wheel in emergency response. Participants will walk away with the tools they need to gain a legitimate dollar value for their agency. A value that can be used to justify capital improvements, staffing increases, or simply a better un-derstanding of how much your fire department means to those you protect.

Speaker:

Lee Levesque
Cancer: Prevent it, Detect it Early, Survive It!

Cancer exposure occurs on the fireground, in fire stations, and even from the gear designed to protect firefighters. Leveraging new 2020 analyses from the Center for Fire, Rescue, and EMS Health Research, the Firefighter Cancer Support Network (FCSN) will reveal the cancers that impact the fire service most frequently, and best practices for reducing exposure and preventing cancer. FCSN will also share the services offered to firefighters and their family members in the unfortunate event that they do have to deal with a cancer diagnosis. There will also be a program teaching firefighters to recognize early warning signs of cancer.

Speakers:

Commanding Stress: A Firefighter's Guide to Peak Performance

Emergency responders are assaulted each day by numerous forms of stress, ranging from the routine challenges of life to the unexpected trauma of fires and other disasters. This class is designed to help you function safely and effectively in a stressful environment. It is based on lessons learned from many years of managing fire and emergency operations with the FDNY. Personal fire experiences and videos are used to illustrate techniques that help you manage stress and perform more effectively in any kind of emergency operation. The presentation examines stress psychology but is geared to provide practical, hands-on recommendations for firefighters, company officers, chiefs, and EMS personnel.

Speaker:

Thomas Dunne
How to Achieve the Gold Standard of Handline Fire Attack Packages

It takes success in three areas to reach a gold standard handline attack package—proper nozzle selection, proper discharge pressure and proper hose spec. This class will first cover the benefits of reducing nozzle pressure and focusing on gpm while establishing a diminishing return range in both directions regarding application rate, stream velocity/nozzle pressure and reach. It will then focus on the need to properly spec handline hose to ensure that the handline attack-package system works in concert with the fire attack team. The last item, the handline hose itself, is vastly misunderstood and represents the largest challenge to get right.

Speaker:

Dennis LeGear
Leadership & Liability

Being a leader in today’s fire service is a difficult challenge – complicated by a seemingly endless list of legal concerns. Legal concerns can stifle or even paralyze leaders who are not prepared. The solution is not to require fire officers to go to law school – but rather to learn effective techniques for approaching legal problems in order to make good decisions. This program will provide the skills and techniques that fire service leaders need to make effective decisions despite difficult legal considerations. Don’t let legal concerns paralyze you!

Speaker:

Curt Varone
Leading without Incident Slides

This class will serve as a successful guide for younger promoted officers or officers with limited emergency response experience in the fire service. The program will cover topics including leading by example, how to set achievable expectations and where accountability is needed by your crew and yourself. You will leave how to care for your people, what humility is and where it is needed and how to control egos in the firehouse. Training will also be covered, because sweeping your weaknesses under the rug will catch up to you.

Speaker:

Performance Under Pressure: Building a Reality Based Training Program

Athletes, military and law enforcement have been using psychology and reality-based training to gain an edge over their enemy or opponent. The fire service is catching up by utilizing a step-by-step methodology to achieve peak performance during calls and more efficient decision-making processes during size up. The methods shared are compiled by years of research from sport psychology, military and law enforcement. This open and honest lecture provides the attendees with a model in conducting reality-based training from the basic recruit to the incident commander. The presenters will discuss the “flow state” and how that will help firefighters dominate the fireground.

Speaker:

Rob Blasetti
Search Procedures and the Rapid Intervention Team Officer

This firefighter rescue class is geared to departments that are already complying with a two-in/two-out policy and are trained in the basic concept of the rapid intervention team (RIT). This program will cover RIT search techniques including search goals, pre-search procedures, mayday procedures, conducting the search, using search ropes, and specialized equipment for RIT. Case studies will be reviewed along with real-life experience in downed firefighter events. This class will help RIT members reach the next level in search procedures for a down firefighter and give RIT officers the information needed to lead their team.

Speaker:

The Nashville Christmas Day 2020 Bombing: Why Agency Partnerships Were the Key to a Smooth Operation

On Christmas morning in 2020, a vehicle-borne improvised explosive device was detonated in downtown Nashville. The blast damaged more than 40 buildings and started multiple fires. Scott Burgess, who was the initial incident commander, will explain the response and the challenges that were faced by the Nashville Fire Department. He will cover the tactics and deployment of suppression, hazmat and USAR teams. Additionally, he will discuss the setup of EMS, triage and MCI components as well as how partnerships with local, state and federal authorities were the keys to a seamless establishment of a unified command and, more importantly, a major incident that ran like a well-oiled machine.

Speaker:

Scott Burgess
Urban Search & Rescue Operations: First-Arriving Tactical Priorities

This program is designed to provide insight for first-arriving personnel at technical rescue incidents, looking at common technical rescue incidents such as confined space rescue, trench rescue, tower rescue and building collapses providing time-proven, common-sense tactical priorities. The presenters will discuss the common pitfalls of officers who have not considered practical strategies or the regulations and standards that apply to these types of incidents. The presenters will also examine specialized equipment, regulations and training requirements impacting those operating at these types of incidents, utilizing a street-sense approach to help the first-arriving decision-maker meet the challenges of these complex incidents.

Speaker:

Kent Freeman
Vehicle Rescue 2021 Update

This University of Extrication presentation explains why many familiar extrication techniques are becoming obsolete on modern-day vehicles. Stabilizing high ground-clearance passenger vehicles or those with run-flat tires are just a few of the updates rescue officers need to consider. The presenter will explain these new advances as well as show attendees how to modify their existing NFPA 1006-compliant Ops- and Technician-level rescue extrication training to address these new technologies and techniques.

Speaker:

Ron Moore
2:00 PM
Low-Titer O-Positive Whole Blood in the Large Urban Fire-Based EMS Environment

Trauma patients bleed whole blood. However, over the last three decades, trauma patients requiring resuscitation have typically received crystalloids during prehospital resuscitation and blood component therapy during in-hospital trauma resuscitation. Blood-based resuscitation, specifically the use of low titer O-positive whole blood (LTOWB), is available to very few prehospital providers. This presentation reviews a large-scale, multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional regional trauma system prehospital LTOWB program in Southwest Texas. A large urban fire-based EMS system and 18 rural EMS systems and air medical providers deployed LTOWB for the treatment of patients in hemorrhagic shock. Attendees will learn about this successful deployment of LTOWB in the prehospital setting.

Speakers:

David Wampler Christopher Winckler
2:45 PM
Commanding the First 30 Minutes & Beyond

The first 30 minutes at a working fire or incident will set the stage for success or an uphill battle. This interactive class takes the students and places them in the front right seat of the first-due apparatus and walks them through the steps to successfully handle the emergency situation. Areas of focus include: pre-arrival information, establishment of command, incident size up, resource request, engine/truck operations, incident command & control, demobilization & termination and report writing.

Speaker:

John Hayowyk
Getting Down Alive: Roof Construction and Operations

This comprehensive class includes safety techniques, strategies and tactics from fireground to roof. Topics include: easy to understand roof construction and roof covering identification; quick size-up techniques, tool selection and placement; ladder placement and execution; ladder to roof transition; safe roof operations; where to make the cut; ventilation techniques; and solar considerations. Developed from more than 20 years of roof construction and fireground expertise, this class delivers an eye-opening experience and provides invaluable information to first responders, allowing them to be better equipped to handle the dangerous assignment of roof ventilation.

Speaker:

Daniel Waldrep
Pillars of the Fireground

Oftentimes, our fireground can become a complex myriad of tactics and tasks, when in actuality, two pillars—search and fire attack—are all that it takes for a successful outcome. This class will cover in detail both search and fire attack using an aggressive and smart mindset that is backed by time tested experience and research. This interactive video-based lecture and discussion will help attendees decide what is better for the trapped occupant—taking the problem away from the victim, or taking the victim away from the problem.

Speaker:

Kevin Lewis
Searchable vs. Survivable: Educational Decision Making

In this session, the presenters will be covering statistics and sharing videos to drive home points of why and when we search as well as the importance of the search size-up. They will also explain why some searches fail while others are successful. There is no singular mode, rather multiple methods to enhance the survivability for the unprotected occupant. This course is about how we search, when to search and what’s the best way to affect our search, increasing our odds not only to locate a victim but remove them in the most efficient manner.

Speaker:

Sean Duffy
The Rapid Intervention Reality of Your Department

Are the firefighters on your department being properly prepared to function in the rapid intervention role? What should they be doing when assigned and what should be their capabilities? More importantly, does your department’s command and safety officers understand the intricacies and nuances of a rapid intervention team (RIT) deployment on the fireground? Are your members ready to meet the challenge of the important role of the RIT on today’s dynamic fireground? This program will provide the participants with the necessary blueprint to take back to their department to analyze capabilities and update thought processes and training programs needed to meet today’s challenges.

Speaker:

Jeffrey Pindelski
3:00 PM
Fireground Size-Up for the Engine, Ladder and Chief

This seminar is a MUST for every current or future fire officer! This experienced base approach to knowing "when to stay" or "when to go" are the critical factors outlined in this seminar. Situational awareness/fireground size-up, or the lack of it, is a consistent series of factors that leads to the success or failure of an emergency inci-dent. This program is designed to enhance your anticipative skills.

Speaker:

Michael Terpak
Highway Incident Operations for Fire & EMS

The presenters at this session will review case studies and offer defensive strategies for roadway incident scene management. There will also be an overview of the emerging hazards related to semi-autonomous vehicles and the benefits of connected-vehicle technology like digital alerting devices. The presenters will also review the results of a study about emergency lighting use at incident scenes. Attendees will walk away with the essential actions every fire department should be taking to protect their personnel from being struck on the highway and they will also learn about some new technology and equipment to consider for their emergency vehicles to improve scene safety.

Speaker:

Jack Sullivan
Managing Everyday Incidents

As the fire service, we respond to many different types of calls. Some of our responses are adrenaline pumping and mandate vigorous effort, which incorporate the use of several engine, truck and rescue companies operating simultaneously. This class will discuss the less glamorous side of the job, handling the common everyday service calls, which are emergencies for those calling. The fire service is just that: a service. We run more everyday emergencies than the multi-alarm structure fires or MV’s with entrapment. It’s important to know how to properly handle the everyday emergencies to provide the best customer service to the citizens we protect.

Speakers:

John Hayowyk Sean Eagen
Pediatric Rapid-Fire Cases

This session will be a rapid review of common and challenging pediatric case scenarios. Attendees will have the opportunity to expand their experience and knowledge of pediatrics. The format will include pediatric cases followed by multiple choice questions to allow attendees to strengthen their skills and to prompt discussion. Brief explanations will be given after each case to help solidify knowledge.

Speakers:

RIT Operations: Officer Impact and Development

This course will prepare the officer or senior member to deploy, manage and control a rapid intervention team (RIT). The presenter will discuss the reasons maydays occur and correlate lessons learned to NIOSH reports. Attendees will engage in thought-provoking discussions on ways to prepare for the challenges of the fireground. This course is appropriate for all officer experience levels and will include a collaborative discussion facilitated by an experienced RIT instructor.

Speaker:

Say YES to VES

Limited staffing, building construction and recent scientific data are all forcing us to reevaluate methods we have used for decades. Vent Enter Search (VES) is no different. To be the best fire service professionals we can, we must fully understand fire dynamics as they relate to VES. This will allow us to operate as safely as possible while providing the maximum level of proficiency upholding our primary mission—life safety. The course will cover VES history, VES size up, evaluating risk/need for VES, specific step-by-step how-to techniques, and the when and where aspects of VES.

Speaker:

Kevin Lewis
Stretching for Success

The attendees shall be exposed to aspects of “go” and “no-go” situations. During “go” situations, attendees will be given critical knowledge of what it takes to win the fight. Starting with the positioning of the apparatus, size-up, and line selection. A special emphasis will be placed on the pace of the attack, water flow while advancing, and using the reach of your stream inside the structure. Additionally, overcoming difficult stretches and dealing with knee-wall fires will be discussed. Within the modern fire environment, we must throw more water than BTUs being produced. The bottom line is WATER WINS!!

Speaker:

Steve Robertson
The 25 Live: Cancer Prevention Tips to Transform Your Fire Department

In this class, the presenter will discuss "The 25" Live checklist, which was created with the intent of evaluating your current practices, in comparison to the best practices for preventing cancer. Do you wear your SCBA? Use wipes on scene? Switch into backup PPE ASAP? The presenter will examine the list for these and more tips.

Speaker:

Jim Burneka Jr.
Thermal Imaging: Not Just for Overhaul Anymore

This class covers the who, what, when, where, why and how of thermal imaging camera (TIC) usage in the fire service both on the fireground and off. By the end of this course, students will have an understanding on how the imager works, understand how to properly read the information the TIC is giving you, have the knowledge to make informed, educated decisions based on the information from the TIC, and have the understanding and knowledge base to use the camera in the many situations.

Speaker:

Joseph DeVito
Tower Ladders: Setting Up for Success

This program will provide the answer to why we consider the tower ladder both an offensive and defensive tool on the fireground. The basic steps of how to use this tool to its maximum capability will be presented in an organized approach from start to finish. The program will emphasize the importance of getting this apparatus in position early and the advantages it can provide the department throughout the incident. This versatile tool can help provide a safe and efficient platform to work from at various occupancies and buildings located in the suburban setting.

Speaker:

Christopher G. Eysser
Training as the Priority in the Volunteer Fire Service

Making training a priority in volunteer or mostly volunteer fire departments can be a struggle. This can lead to catastrophic results such as an increase in risk for injury and/or death and failing to meet the expectations of the communities they serve. This course will help the firefighter determine the need for training for themselves and their department, and how to make it the leading priority. Topics to be discussed include organizational training needs and expectations, selecting a training officer, training program delivery, and personal responsibility in maintaining a healthy training environment.

Speaker:

Justin Bailey
Urban Water Rescue Considerations

Flooding events are becoming more common in our communities. The 100-year flood has been happening every 3-5 years. Training for the urban environment needs to meet the increasing demand for this type of operation. Rescue teams need to understand the dynamic environment when our streets and towns are turned into raging rivers and lakes. This class will cover operations, scene size up, the rescue sequence, victim contact and assessment, and more. Specific training and planning are keys to a successful operation, the better detailed the preparation, the better chance of having a successful operation.

Speaker:

Andrew McIntyre
3:15 PM
Courage Under Fire Leadership: Being the Best Fire Service Professional You Can Be in 2022 & Beyond!

Leadership does not start at the top — it starts at the firehouse and transitions to the emergency scene! Fire departments around the country, are struggling for quality leadership and followership at all ranks. As a fire service professional in today's fire service, you must possess “Courage Under Fire” and continuously aspire to be the best you can be. Current topics affecting the fire service, events that have occurred as well as personal lessons learned, will be shared and discussed in a positive and productive manner!

Speaker:

Steve Prziborowski
Down & Dirty Urban Forcible Entry

This interactive, forcible-entry program focuses on new and older, but yet safe, street-approved methods and techniques for conventional forcible entry tactics. The presenters will discuss and show techniques for making entry through and around locks, for both residential and commercial structures. Attendees will also learn quick access into urban steel roll gates and how to defeat the locks and locking mechanisms for them. Overcoming street hatches, additional security features like drop bars, slide bolts, burglar bars and modified locks will be covered as well. Attendees will be faced with forcible entry scenarios.

Speakers:

Robert James Cameron Peek
Firefighter Safety: Mistakes & Best Practices

This program looks at a summary of common mistakes and best practices discovered from the presenter’s extensive evaluation of more than 500 near-miss reports and line-of-duty casualty investigations. Improve your understanding of what’s killing firefighters at incident scenes and how to improve fireground safety. During this fast-paced program, the presenter will look at the role of staffing, communications, command activities, size-up, strategy, training, near-miss events and post-incident evaluations play in line-of-duty deaths of firefighters. Attendees will be offered best practices to fix the mistakes.

Speaker:

Richard B. Gasaway
First Due? Then it is Up to YOU!!!

Decisions that are made by the initial incident commander (IC) will dictate how well the rest of the incident will operate. That being said, the initial IC burdens much of the success based on the first few minutes after arrival. This course will aid the fire officer in critical decision making on scene to help bring the situation to a successful conclusion. Topics to be covered include incident priorities and objectives; size-up considerations for both windshield and 360 size-ups; influence of fire behavior on decisions; resource deployment; long-term needs of the incident; and demobilization considerations.

Speaker:

Mike Daley
How Ballistic Research has Impacted Nozzle Selection

The modern fire environment requires a weapons package that can rapidly, safely and efficiently knock down interior fires. In the early to mid-1980s, the law enforcement community went through a similar revolution when they moved from revolvers to semi-automatic pistols due to increasing threats from armed criminals. Research indicated officers required weapons that could fire a greater number of rounds, achieve quicker knockdown via deeper penetration, and lower recoil to manageable levels. The fire service needs similar upgrades when selecting nozzles. Attendees will learn nozzle design history, research parallels with ballistics, modern fire behavior, and nozzle selection to combat increased threats on the fireground.

Speaker:

Jonathan Hall
Is Functional Fitness the Miracle Cure for the Fire Service?

In this seminar, the presenter will talk about all the positive aspects a functional fitness program can bring to the first responder. He will also define "functional" fitness for the firefighter, EMT and medic and how we should be working out as fire rescue athletes. This session will also include some Q&A where attendees will have the opportunity to discuss the fitness trends in the fire service.

Speaker:

Aaron Zamzow
Managing the Multi-alarm

This course will focus on common sense tips for the first-due battalion chief faced with a multi-alarm incident. Topics will include organizing the incident, resource tracking, building an effective command team, instituting the Operations Section and transitioning to a command vehicle, all while maintaining situational awareness. This course will also offer resources for participants to conduct command training at their departments.

Speakers:

Marshall Noyes
Social Media for Today’s Fire Service

This workshop will address how your organization can actively engage your audience using social media during emergency and non-emergency situations. Discussion points will include the most effective social media tools and when to use them. As a seasoned public information officer (PIO), the presenter will share how to use social media to transform public images of your organization and how to communicate with your communities. Anyone responsible for social media, including PIOs, should take this workshop. Anyone who wants to use social media will find the program helpful and will help improve the product you put out.

Speaker:

Robert Reardon
Sudden Cardiac Death and Resuscitation in Pediatrics

The death of a child is always hard to understand, even more so when it is unexpected and sudden. This session will help attendees understand, in a practical way, the most common causes of sudden cardiac death in pediatrics and how to recognize the clinical scenarios. Pediatric resuscitation, from a historical perspective to the latest research, will be presented in a way that is practical and will increase the attendees’ confidence and expertise. Come and learn from one who has studied pediatric sudden cardiac death for 30 years, from the perspective of pediatric electrophysiology as well as an emergency medicine.

Speaker:

Beth Bubolz
Tactical Thermal Imaging: Enhancing Fireground Strategies & Tactics

Firefighters understand the value and the power of the first-due officer's size-up. Those initial actions set the tone for the ultimate outcome of the incident. While few classes include or implement thermal data to enhance the strategies and tactics of the company officer's incident action plan, this course will provide experientially relevant examples of proper thermal data interpretation during the size-up, as the incident progresses, and in several other incident-based scenarios. This course is an overview of a 16-hour Company Officer Program where the presenters explain and demonstrate how building science thermography can be used to improve the overall fireground strategies and tactics.

Speaker:

Andrew Starnes
Tribulation, Tragedy and Triumph: A Close Call, a Double LODD and the Lessons Learned

The Colerain Township Department of Fire and Emergency Medical Services has responded to three similar basement fires in a 13-year period that had three dissimilar results. The first involved a close call when a lieutenant fell into a basement but was able to self-rescue. The second resulted in two line-of-duty deaths when a captain and firefighter both fell into a basement. The third fire had a successful outcome due to the lessons learned from the first two incidents. The presenters of this session examine all three incidents and share the lessons learned.

Speaker:

Allen Walls

Wednesday, December 9, 2020

General Sessions

8:00 AM
A New Chief's Guide to Surviving Local Politics

Newly promoted chief officers are often well versed in the strategies, tactics, and operations of their departments. With their new positions come the added responsibility of becoming the “face” of their agency. The focus is on the formal and informal politics that a newly promoted chief officer must be ready to encounter, navigate, and engage upon. This interactive presentation will discuss how politics impact not only the internal stakeholders, but also the external stakeholders. Emphasis will be placed on the attitude, practices and steps that the new chief can take to avoid mayhem and survive local politics.

Speaker:

Jared Renshaw
Are Millennials Really the Problem?

This class will involve real case studies on mentoring and its effect on our youth. It will be interactive and action-packed as the presenter describes the trials, tribulations and celebrations of mentoring.

Speaker:

Jacob Johnson
Blocker Rigs: Traffic Management Apparatus

Working traffic accidents is extremely dangerous for first responders. With major highways running through busy cities, numerous accidents occur daily. Following a horrifically close call for three Irving, TX, firefighters in 2015, Chief Victor Conley developed a lifesaving, cost-cutting plan—the blocker program. He repurposed retired fire apparatus, retrofitting them and using them as blockers—the first line of protection for fire, EMS, police and wrecker operators on accident scenes.

Speaker:

Creating a Psychologically Healthy Fire Department

This course from the National Volunteer Fire Council and the American Psychological Association's Center for Organizational Excellence is designed to empower fire department leadership to promote and support their departments. Based on the framework from the Psychologically Healthy Fire Departments initiative, this course focuses on six key practices—member involvement, health and safety, member growth and development, work-life balance, member recognition, and effective communication—to facilitate member well-being and department functioning. This will help leadership become better equipped to recognize, mitigate, and support behavioral health issues within departments while overcoming cultural stigmas that have plagued the fire/EMS service for far too long.

Speaker:

David Ballard
Electric and Autonomous Vehicles

During this University of Extrication presentation, the presenter will look at the challenges that exist for responders dealing with crashes or fires involving electric vehicles (EVs) and autonomous vehicles (AVs). This multi-media program utilizes case studies from around the world to illustrate what lies in store for responders next time they encounter an EV or AV. 

Speaker:

Ron Moore
Engine Company Search

Life Safety is the number one priority of the fire service, typically accomplished by searching for victims inside fire buildings. The best thing an engine company can do to save lives is to stretch a line and extinguish the fire, however this alone does not locate and remove victims. In this session, the presenter reveals a plan for departments with limited staffing to accomplish both of these important tasks. This is NOT an ideal situation, as separate crews will always be faster and more efficient, but this class is designed for those engine companies operating without support apparatus that need to accomplish both tasks.

Speaker:

Robert C. Owens Sr.
Evaluation and Care of the TASERed

This class will cover the design and function of the TASER. The presenter will examine medically documented injuries and treatments and explore the concepts of extreme agitation and excited delirium.

Speaker:

Robert Lowe
Fire Operations in High-Rise and Large-Area Structures

In this session, various elements of fire protection systems are translated "to the street" for firefighters and company officers. Significant knowledge of standpipe and sprinkler systems, fire pumps, fire alarm control panels, and other building safety features is often reserved for fire prevention or code enforcement personnel. Attendees will gain an understanding of complex fire protection system components that will enable them to apply the easy-to-remember principles on working incidents. Attendees are also guided in developing a realistic company-level pre-incident planning program. Case studies involving LODDs and high-dollar-loss fires that occurred in buildings despite fire protection systems being in place are also examined.

Speaker:

Brad French
First Due: The First Five Minutes

In this session, the presenters will explore the “bread-and-butter” operations of the first-due engine company and how everyone’s role supports and builds upon the others. The presenters will look at size-up and the survivability profile; water supply and handline placement; whether to go traditional, transitional, or defensive and a whole lot more. Both strategic and tactical considerations will be considered throughout the discussion. The program will be presented in an interactive and engaging manner, emphasizing best practices and using high-impact case studies.

Speaker:

John Brophy
From the Rig to the Roof: Ventilation Principles & Practices

The two most important tasks to be carried out at the scene of a house fire are the fire attack and the search for trapped civilians. The quicker we accomplish ventilation, the quicker companies can get water on the fire and conduct search and rescue operations. How the roof team goes about carrying out this task is risky and needs to be a well-choreographed dance that addresses two main things—ensuring we effectively and timely vent the structure, and ensuring the safety of the roof team throughout the operation. The presenters will address the above and attendees will leave with an effective roof operation.

Speakers:

Go Beneath the Surface: Learning to Develop Your People from the Inside Out

Drawn from his Human Domain Operators Course specifically developed for Special Operations Forces, the presenter unpacks and uncovers all aspects of the human domain and provides actionable processes for advancing training, leadership and organizational development. The objective of this session is to provide the individual and company the tools and insights necessary to develop individual skills, internal team strengths, and external capabilities to influence the operational environment.

Speaker:

Jeff Banman
Leadership from the Bottom Up!

This fun and engaging leadership class is designed to inspire, educate and motivate attendees on how to help yourself, each other and your organization, all while rekindling your spirit! Attendees, from firefighters to fire chiefs, will walk away with valuable information on enhancing individual and organizational performance. Let go of things not in your control (negative narrative) before they pull you down. Your passion, thoughts, feelings and behavior are in your control! Leaders typically work their way up from the bottom and never forget where they came from. All organizations have issues and now is your time to be part of the solution.

Speaker:

Candace Ashby
Lessons Learned: Calumet Water Reclamation Plant Explosion and Building Collapse

In this presentation, the presenter will share the lessons learned following the August 2018 explosion and collapse at a southside Chicago plant. As Chief of Special Operations at the time of the response, and responsible for overall command on scene, the presenter will provide direct details on the timeline of events that resulted in the successful rescue of a civilian plant employee. The presentation will connect this success to the impact of technical rescue training on the responding companies.

Speaker:

Tim Walsh
Lessons Learned: Jackson Memorial Middle School Shooting

On Feb. 20, 2018, Jackson Memorial Middle School in Ohio was the site of a fatal self-inflicted shooting involving a 13-year-old male student. This immediately made the middle school, and all local campuses, go into lockdown. Fire, EMS and law enforcement agencies converged on the scene. The initial intelligence reported that this was the first step in a planned mass shooting. The event went from a suicide to a large-scale operation. This class will explain the course of events of handling the school shooting emergency. Lessons learned will be examined, with each layer of the event, as they unfolded.

Speaker:

Kai Rieger
Medical Director Nightmares

The role of a medical director at an EMS agency is varied and plentiful. Often it is rewarding and fulfilling, but at times it can stray into the bizarre and soul-crushing. Come learn some of the bizarre, real-world scenarios that have challenged medical directors and how they successfully—or not so successfully—managed them. Engage and learn on scenarios both funny and frankly unbelievable, while learning how this essential role can help your department achieve success in daily operations.

Speakers:

John Casey
Opening Keynote: Mission, Metrics and Vision

Nearly 50 years ago the seminal document America Burning was published, forging the mission, metrics and vision for the fire service we know today. As we approach the half century anniversary we must pause to take stock of our progress, evaluate our current environment and identify future potential. The success of our last 50 years has been a dramatic reduction in the number of fires; the potential consequence is rising complacency. Join us for a deep discussion on how we recalibrate our mission and our metrics today to support the a vision of vigilance going forward for our service.  

Speaker:

Brian Brush
Rescuer Near Misses and Using Live People for Rescue Training

We should always have full control over training, but even the best plans have risks. If we look at some of the near-miss investigations, we see that many of these incidents were, in fact, preventable. This program will discuss factors to be considered when using live “victims” during training, modifying a training plan, writing a lesson plan for success and more. Attendees will be able to take back the lessons learned to their own department and review their operating policies and procedures and make sound recommendations.

Speaker:

Christopher Feder
Staying Aggressively Positive

How can anyone hate going to the firehouse? It might be because of the people found inside. Sometimes we let our opinions and thoughts get in the way of our chosen profession. One way to fix that is to stay aggressively positive. In this highly interactive session, the presenter will dive into the why, how, and where firefighters can focus their attention to stay positive around the firehouse. How can you deal with the downers while building your circle of influence? This session will engage all the attendees to participate in a fluid, non-scripted discussion.

Speaker:

Ryan Pennington
Taming the Tigers of Transition

The decision to go from an all-volunteer to a combination-type system is often a difficult one. The road to success is riddled with pitfalls and obstacles most every step of the way. Learn from a fire department leader who was in the trenches during the worst of times struggling through the transition. While there is no “cookie cutter” solution to all transition-related issues, this class will provide you with a vast array of examples of which tactics work, as well as which ones do not, should your department find itself trying to tame the tigers of transition.

Speaker:

James Jester
The Art of Reading Smoke: The Next Generation

Today's structure fires are more hostile than ever before. The heat release rates and fire growth currently encountered are unparalleled in fire service history. It is imperative for first-arriving firefighters, officers, and chief officers to rapidly read and recognize the fire's location, progression, and future before committing personnel to the interior. This session brings a new library of videos, new research, and a frank discussion on cancer risks and prevention to build intellectually aggressive firefighters. Consistently reviewed as "the best class I have ever taken," this session cannot be missed!

Speaker:

Rob Backer
The Company Officer as an Instructor

An effective company officer is the keystone to operational success. This high-energy class will provide fire officers with various instructor resources and training ideas that are geared toward informal, company-based daily drills. With these elements, officers can more effectively reinforce skill competence and develop an intimate familiarity of their company’s first-due response district. Session attendees will leave re-energized to take their company-level training to new heights. If you want to make positive changes in your organization, officer development is where it starts.

Speaker:

Brad French
The Paradigm Shift in Wellness Best Practices for Fire Recruits

As the fire service continues to develop and evolve, a shift towards emphasizing wellness and training as a whole has been identified. Based upon five years of data and observation, predictors for future recruit performance have been identified and guided our program development. These traits have led to the creation and implementation of repeatable and analyzable fitness testing, a comprehensive injury prevention program, and influenced hiring and retention standards for recruits better aligned with NFPA 1582. This paradigm shift towards prioritizing wellness at the recruit level allows for a strong foundation translating into measurable department wide changes.

Speakers:

Mackey Hermosillo
Working Outside on the First-Due Truck

Do you want to get some hands-on experience, working as an exterior crew, on the first-due truck? In this class, the presenter will cover riding positions, ground ladders, ventilation, truck positioning, and vertical ventilation on residential structures. The presenter will use mid-mount platforms and tiller trucks in this class and explain some of the benefits of both trucks.

Speaker:

Sexton Towns
9:15 AM
Changing the Outcome of Our Neighborhood Stroke Patient

Fire departments in Columbus, OH, partnered on the revolutionary and innovative Mobile Stroke Treatment Unit (MSTU), which was launched on May 29, 2019. Among mobile stroke programs throughout the country, the Columbus unit is among busiest units, responding to more than 2,000 calls of CVA in the first year and transporting nearly 450 patients. Treating these patients on an average 26 minutes faster than the emergency department, the MSTU program provides a view of what the future view of how prehospital and hospital providers could provide the powerful treatments and therapies at a local and community level.

Speaker:

Nathan Jennings
Command Success

Speaker:

Curt Isakson
Courage Under Fire Leadership: 10 Commandments of a Great Fire Officer!

This session is intended for fire service professionals of all ranks (especially current and future fire officers) who are open to suggestions for improvement and best practices. Sadly, many personnel of all ranks (especially officers) are just calling it in or have “retired in place.” Attendees will be exposed to the 10 Commandments to inspire them to be the best they can be. Areas discussed include but are not limited to leadership, officer development, customer service, team building, emergency scene operations, mentoring and succession planning. It takes true “courage” to be a leader in today’s fire service – do you have what it takes?

Speaker:

Steve Prziborowski
Developing Today's Truck Company Culture

A well-established truck company culture creates the foundation for effective truck company operations on the fireground. Both are mentally and physically demanding and require members to be technically proficient for success at fire scenes. This presentation will give you a thorough knowledge of truck company operations and the necessary tools and equipment to accomplish coordinated fireground operations to effectively carry out life-saving tasks.

Speaker:

Sean Eagen
Getting the Most Out of Your Recruit Training Program

The most influential time in any new firefighter’s career is the first months they are with your organization. You only have a short time during the recruit academy to set the foundation that will either become a storied career, or a 30-year drain on your department. Organizing and running a top shelf program takes a lot of effort before, during, and after the students leave the building, but a successful recruit academy is the bedrock of a successful department. This class will help the attendee identify what makes a successful recruit program and the tools needed to sustain the academy.

Speaker:

Keith Niemann
Leading with Labor: A Cooperative Approach to Advance the Fire Service

All too often the idea of fire service labor/management relations brings to mind contentious arguments and petty departmental feuds. Attendees will gain better understanding of not only the value of a strong working relationship between labor and management, but they will also learn and discuss ways to improve existing dynamics at their agency. A strong labor/management relationship fosters a more productive and safer environment for firefighters and the citizens they are sworn to protect. This interactive session will challenge conventional thinking and motivate fire service leaders of all ranks to make the best job in the world even better.

Speaker:

Lithium-ion Battery Systems and Firefighter Safety

On April 19, 2019, four firefighters received serious injuries as a result of cascading thermal runaway within a lithium-ion battery energy system that led to a deflagration event. This presentation will review recent lithium-ion battery testing, a developed test methodology to evaluate energy storage systems and how these interact with the contributing factors and subsequent recommendations issued in an effort to reduce the risk of a repeat event. The presenters will also review current testing that is scheduled in the interim.

Speaker:

Sean DeCrane
Rescue Me: Strategies and Tactics for Employee Fires

Most fire officers and chiefs will fight more fires in the station then they will out in the streets. This program will utilize basic fireground terminology to break down and make sense of employee coaching, counseling and disciplinary procedures. The presenter will also focus on using fire prevention, education, pre-planning and fire behavior recognition training (reading smoke) to prevent fires (problems) and keep them small. The presenters will also compare hostile fire events, such as rapid-fire progression, flashover, backdraft and smoke explosions, to the more difficult personnel issues. The course will conclude with several “fire simulations” using video and role-player scenarios.

Speaker:

Jesse Quinalty
Response to Civil Unrest

Incidents of civil unrest can happen in any jurisdiction, at any time, for a multitude of reasons. Civil unrest, or civil disturbance, is defined as “acts of violence and disorder detrimental to the public law and order. It includes acts such as riots, acts of violence, insurrections, unlawful obstructions or assemblages. It also includes all domestic conditions requiring or likely to require the use of federal armed forces.” Departments must alter their standard policies, procedures, and mindsets to safely and effectively respond to these incidents. Attendees will examine building construction features, occupancy types, scene security, fireground hazards, strategies and tactics, and past responses.

Speaker:

Jonathan Hall
Roof Member Rescue/Mayday

The two most important tasks to be carried out at the scene of a house fire are the fire attack and the search for trapped civilians. The quicker we accomplish ventilation, the quicker companies can get water on the fire and conduct search and rescue operations. How the roof team goes about carrying out this task is risky and needs to be a well-choreographed dance that addresses two main things—ensuring we effectively and timely vent the structure, and ensuring the safety of the roof team throughout the operation. The presenters will address the above and attendees will leave with an effective roof operation.

Speakers:

Shaping Your Volunteer Fire Department to Fit Today's Expectations

Is your volunteer department struggling to maintain relevance in our changing society? Does your current service delivery model meet the needs and expectations of your community? Are you struggling to recruit, train, and retain members? There seems to be a nationwide panic about the critical shortage of volunteers. Does it have to be this way? In this class, the presenters will examine how industry and society trends impact today’s volunteer fire service, taking a hard look at the way we've always done it, as well as sharing and developing alternative ways to recruit, market, lead, train and manage our departments and members.

Speaker:

Brandon Fletcher
The Contemporary Fire Problem: Lightweight Multi-Unit Residential Complexes

The intensified market for affordable housing and urban “downtown” residential living space has led to the increased construction of large-scale townhouse and multi-unit residential complexes in both urban and suburban environments. The lightweight materials and pre-engineered methods used to construct these developments, along with other inherent design weaknesses (such as limited access and egress, inadequate sprinkler protection, pedestal construction, exposure hazards, and significant life-safety issues), present unique fire suppression and incident command challenges. This dynamic training program will take an in-depth look at these hazards while providing valuable fireground information concerning size-up, plan review, incident management, pre-planning, and fire suppression strategy and tactics.

Speakers:

Robert Moran
9:45 AM
Measuring Success of Your EMS System

In this session, participants will review the pertinent quality parameters and patient outcome variables that are essential for developing an impactful EMS continuous quality improvement (CQI) program. The session will focus on time-critical diagnoses (cardiac arrest, STEMI, stroke, trauma and sepsis), high-risk patient encounters, the dispatch process, and unique EMS roles (community paramedicine, naloxone distribution programs, vaccine administration). Participants will also review methods for collecting variables, analyzing data, implementing process changes and performing reassessments.

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11:00 AM
Real World ECGs

ECGs are an increasingly utilized during pre-hospital intervention with an ever-increasing list of indications. Interpretation can be a challenge in the best of conditions, let alone the uncontrolled scene response. Patient movement, electrical noise, movement artifact and other challenges (i.e., diaphoresis and chest hair) can make for less than perfect ECGs that then need to be interpreted. Once all that could be corrected has been fixed—it’s time to dig in and give a read. This course will challenge even the savviest paramedic and demonstrate tips, tricks and tools for getting all the information that can be garnered from ECGs.

Speakers:

John Casey
12:00 PM
PPE Purchasing Committee

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Tech Rescue Tool Showcase

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Mike Daley
1:00 PM
Apparatus Operators Role in a Safe & Efficient Fireground

This interactive class is about setting clear expectations for the driver operator on the fireground. With manpower shortages facing most fire service agencies in the country, it is vital to have an all-hands-on-deck approach to fireground tasks for the safety of our members and the public we serve. This class looks at fireground support task that can be completed by the driver operator outside the IDLH space. These tasks will improve the safety and efficiency of the company. An efficient fireground relies on all players to be highly trained and highly engaged in the incident.

Speaker:

Brian Gettemeier
Developing Safe and Effective Fireground Operations

In this session the presenters will look at a program that has been developed to re-envision firefighter training and performance from the ground up. This process, which can easily be based off your department protocols, district, and staffing, will use a continuous improvement mindset to take firefighters from task-level skillset development and ‘pre-mortems’ to effective fireground operations and thorough after-action reviews. Its modular design not only allows you to adapt the program to fit your structure and needs, but allows for ongoing evaluation of the program’s effectiveness. And its street-level feel creates buy-in from firefighters and officers at all levels.

Speaker:

Brian Bastinelli
Fireground Operations Inside Hoarding Conditions

Immediately identifying, adjusting and attacking fires that occur inside buildings cluttered with years of content is essential for victim rescue and firefighter safety. Firefighters of all levels should be aware of the cues and clues of a serenely cluttered environment and how to adjust tactics to reduce the chance of firefighter injury and victim rescue. The chances of firefighters operating inside hoarding conditions is increasing and so should firefighter education on battling fires in hoarding conditions.

Speaker:

Ryan Pennington
No Excuses: Tactics for the Understaffed Department

Many fire departments are understaffed, but that is no excuse not to be prepared. If you have items such as thermal imaging cameras, piercing nozzles, and high-flow/low-pressure hoselines, you must use them to their fullest potential. The presenter will discuss building a tactical playbook for your response. Just as a quarterback will read a defense to ensure the play called meets the situation, your playbook sets expectations but allows responders to pick the best tactic or “play” for the current conditions. Attendees will gain a greater understanding of how to develop tactical options that fit in the context of the understaffed department.

Speaker:

Joey Baxa
Riding Shotgun

This presentation takes an in-depth look at the roles and responsibilities of riding the right front seat on and off the fireground. Often, firefighters are not aware of the expectations that come along with this position. Many believe riding shotgun only deals with decisions while on the scene of emergencies. This is only one small part of a larger responsibility as the company officer. Company officers need to understand that not only will they be fire officers, but they become parental figures, coaches, counselors, and much more to their crew.

Speaker:

Timothy S. Cowan
San Antonio Fire Department Fighting the Opioid Epidemic

In America, more than 100 people die every day from an opioid-related drug overdose. The San Antonio Fire Department Mobil Integrated Health (MIH) Division has developed and deployed two distinct programs to address the opioid crisis. The first program provides community education, Narcan kits, and harm reduction education with great success. The second program addresses the need for an opioid dependence referral process for those seeking treatment, which allows MIH to start immediate medication assisted recovery in the patient’s home with the administration of buprenorphine titrated to symptom control, while awaiting placement in an outpatient treatment center.

Speaker:

Christopher Winckler
Solar Energy and the Fire Service

This class is designed to shift the paradigm in thinking towards a more proactive strategic approach to managing highly complex and dangerous solar energy emergencies not routinely faced by everyday emergency response personnel. Many hidden dangers, such as hazmat battery storage units and excessive building construction weight, is compounded with the addition of solar energy systems. This course provides the answers needed to be more effective in dealing with these dangers and more.

Speaker:

Jeff Simpson
The Search Reformation

This class examines the three key components of a successful search—leadership, the training division and the personnel. Attendees will examine proven skills, debunk myths and review case studies and video of victim rescues involving the use of thermal imaging. Attendees will take part in an interactive multimedia lecture, including multiple case studies, fireground thermal imaging camera video, and helmet-cam footage. Examples, videos and guidelines will be presented and discussed in an attempt to reinforce proven concepts for introduction and continual upkeep of a department’s aggressive search mindset.

Speaker:

Dustin Martinez
Utilizing Data to Justify Organizational Growth

How do you convince the decision-makers to which you report that you need additional staff, funding, or equipment to carry out your organization's mission? Multiple examples are used from the presenter's own department in which he has been able to facilitate almost doubling the number of employees while generating an additional $1 million in EMS revenue annually. Attendees will be shown why knowing your audience and developing personal relationships with your city manager, city councilors, mayor, or other decision-making bodies are key to successful funding requests.

Speaker:

Allen Lewis
1:30 PM
Advanced Medical Devices in Your Community

More and more individuals in your community are being discharged from hospitals with short-term and long-term medical devices that provide life-support and other critical functions. In this session, participants will review advanced medical devices that are increasing in prevalence in the out-of-hospital setting. The session will highlight left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), external defibrillation/cardioversion devices (i.e., Life Vest), continuous infusions of medications for pulmonary hypertension, portable extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) devices, and tracheostomies/mechanical ventilators. Participants will develop a concise approach for troubleshooting and managing these devices.

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Are You Command Capable?

Starting with an interactive discussion focusing on how the attendees arrived at being “Command Capable” the instructors will concentrate on presenting a top ten list of the most critical operational elements necessary to establish, sustain, and command a safe and effective fire suppression operation. Topics to be discussed include size-up, decision making, command structure, building construction, communications, accountability, and strategy and tactics. This class is open to current fire officers and any firefighter who may take on the responsibility of sitting in the front officer’s seat of their apparatus!

Speakers:

Robert Moran
Brass Tax: Determining a True Value of Your Agency

This presentation revolves around the SCILL Equation, a formula that combines commonly found data (protected property values, ISO savings per grade, operational budgets, and local millage rates) with industry standards to determine how much a fire department is worth in honest dollars to their community before they turn a wheel in emergency response. Participants will walk away with the tools they need to gain a legitimate dollar value for their agency. A value that can be used to justify capital improvements, staffing increases, or simply a better un-derstanding of how much your fire department means to those you protect.

Speaker:

Lee Levesque
Cancer: Prevent it, Detect it Early, Survive It!

Cancer exposure occurs on the fireground, in fire stations, and even from the gear designed to protect firefighters. Leveraging new 2020 analyses from the Center for Fire, Rescue, and EMS Health Research, the Firefighter Cancer Support Network (FCSN) will reveal the cancers that impact the fire service most frequently, and best practices for reducing exposure and preventing cancer. FCSN will also share the services offered to firefighters and their family members in the unfortunate event that they do have to deal with a cancer diagnosis. There will also be a program teaching firefighters to recognize early warning signs of cancer.

Speakers:

Commanding Stress: A Firefighter's Guide to Peak Performance

Emergency responders are assaulted each day by numerous forms of stress, ranging from the routine challenges of life to the unexpected trauma of fires and other disasters. This class is designed to help you function safely and effectively in a stressful environment. It is based on lessons learned from many years of managing fire and emergency operations with the FDNY. Personal fire experiences and videos are used to illustrate techniques that help you manage stress and perform more effectively in any kind of emergency operation. The presentation examines stress psychology but is geared to provide practical, hands-on recommendations for firefighters, company officers, chiefs, and EMS personnel.

Speaker:

Thomas Dunne
How to Achieve the Gold Standard of Handline Fire Attack Packages

It takes success in three areas to reach a gold standard handline attack package—proper nozzle selection, proper discharge pressure and proper hose spec. This class will first cover the benefits of reducing nozzle pressure and focusing on gpm while establishing a diminishing return range in both directions regarding application rate, stream velocity/nozzle pressure and reach. It will then focus on the need to properly spec handline hose to ensure that the handline attack-package system works in concert with the fire attack team. The last item, the handline hose itself, is vastly misunderstood and represents the largest challenge to get right.

Speaker:

Dennis LeGear
Leadership & Liability

Being a leader in today’s fire service is a difficult challenge – complicated by a seemingly endless list of legal concerns. Legal concerns can stifle or even paralyze leaders who are not prepared. The solution is not to require fire officers to go to law school – but rather to learn effective techniques for approaching legal problems in order to make good decisions. This program will provide the skills and techniques that fire service leaders need to make effective decisions despite difficult legal considerations. Don’t let legal concerns paralyze you!

Speaker:

Curt Varone
Leading without Incident Slides

This class will serve as a successful guide for younger promoted officers or officers with limited emergency response experience in the fire service. The program will cover topics including leading by example, how to set achievable expectations and where accountability is needed by your crew and yourself. You will leave how to care for your people, what humility is and where it is needed and how to control egos in the firehouse. Training will also be covered, because sweeping your weaknesses under the rug will catch up to you.

Speaker:

Performance Under Pressure: Building a Reality Based Training Program

Athletes, military and law enforcement have been using psychology and reality-based training to gain an edge over their enemy or opponent. The fire service is catching up by utilizing a step-by-step methodology to achieve peak performance during calls and more efficient decision-making processes during size up. The methods shared are compiled by years of research from sport psychology, military and law enforcement. This open and honest lecture provides the attendees with a model in conducting reality-based training from the basic recruit to the incident commander. The presenters will discuss the “flow state” and how that will help firefighters dominate the fireground.

Speaker:

Rob Blasetti
Search Procedures and the Rapid Intervention Team Officer

This firefighter rescue class is geared to departments that are already complying with a two-in/two-out policy and are trained in the basic concept of the rapid intervention team (RIT). This program will cover RIT search techniques including search goals, pre-search procedures, mayday procedures, conducting the search, using search ropes, and specialized equipment for RIT. Case studies will be reviewed along with real-life experience in downed firefighter events. This class will help RIT members reach the next level in search procedures for a down firefighter and give RIT officers the information needed to lead their team.

Speaker:

The Nashville Christmas Day 2020 Bombing: Why Agency Partnerships Were the Key to a Smooth Operation

On Christmas morning in 2020, a vehicle-borne improvised explosive device was detonated in downtown Nashville. The blast damaged more than 40 buildings and started multiple fires. Scott Burgess, who was the initial incident commander, will explain the response and the challenges that were faced by the Nashville Fire Department. He will cover the tactics and deployment of suppression, hazmat and USAR teams. Additionally, he will discuss the setup of EMS, triage and MCI components as well as how partnerships with local, state and federal authorities were the keys to a seamless establishment of a unified command and, more importantly, a major incident that ran like a well-oiled machine.

Speaker:

Scott Burgess
Urban Search & Rescue Operations: First-Arriving Tactical Priorities

This program is designed to provide insight for first-arriving personnel at technical rescue incidents, looking at common technical rescue incidents such as confined space rescue, trench rescue, tower rescue and building collapses providing time-proven, common-sense tactical priorities. The presenters will discuss the common pitfalls of officers who have not considered practical strategies or the regulations and standards that apply to these types of incidents. The presenters will also examine specialized equipment, regulations and training requirements impacting those operating at these types of incidents, utilizing a street-sense approach to help the first-arriving decision-maker meet the challenges of these complex incidents.

Speaker:

Kent Freeman
Vehicle Rescue 2021 Update

This University of Extrication presentation explains why many familiar extrication techniques are becoming obsolete on modern-day vehicles. Stabilizing high ground-clearance passenger vehicles or those with run-flat tires are just a few of the updates rescue officers need to consider. The presenter will explain these new advances as well as show attendees how to modify their existing NFPA 1006-compliant Ops- and Technician-level rescue extrication training to address these new technologies and techniques.

Speaker:

Ron Moore
2:00 PM
Low-Titer O-Positive Whole Blood in the Large Urban Fire-Based EMS Environment

Trauma patients bleed whole blood. However, over the last three decades, trauma patients requiring resuscitation have typically received crystalloids during prehospital resuscitation and blood component therapy during in-hospital trauma resuscitation. Blood-based resuscitation, specifically the use of low titer O-positive whole blood (LTOWB), is available to very few prehospital providers. This presentation reviews a large-scale, multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional regional trauma system prehospital LTOWB program in Southwest Texas. A large urban fire-based EMS system and 18 rural EMS systems and air medical providers deployed LTOWB for the treatment of patients in hemorrhagic shock. Attendees will learn about this successful deployment of LTOWB in the prehospital setting.

Speakers:

David Wampler Christopher Winckler
2:45 PM
Commanding the First 30 Minutes & Beyond

The first 30 minutes at a working fire or incident will set the stage for success or an uphill battle. This interactive class takes the students and places them in the front right seat of the first-due apparatus and walks them through the steps to successfully handle the emergency situation. Areas of focus include: pre-arrival information, establishment of command, incident size up, resource request, engine/truck operations, incident command & control, demobilization & termination and report writing.

Speaker:

John Hayowyk
Getting Down Alive: Roof Construction and Operations

This comprehensive class includes safety techniques, strategies and tactics from fireground to roof. Topics include: easy to understand roof construction and roof covering identification; quick size-up techniques, tool selection and placement; ladder placement and execution; ladder to roof transition; safe roof operations; where to make the cut; ventilation techniques; and solar considerations. Developed from more than 20 years of roof construction and fireground expertise, this class delivers an eye-opening experience and provides invaluable information to first responders, allowing them to be better equipped to handle the dangerous assignment of roof ventilation.

Speaker:

Daniel Waldrep
Pillars of the Fireground

Oftentimes, our fireground can become a complex myriad of tactics and tasks, when in actuality, two pillars—search and fire attack—are all that it takes for a successful outcome. This class will cover in detail both search and fire attack using an aggressive and smart mindset that is backed by time tested experience and research. This interactive video-based lecture and discussion will help attendees decide what is better for the trapped occupant—taking the problem away from the victim, or taking the victim away from the problem.

Speaker:

Kevin Lewis
Searchable vs. Survivable: Educational Decision Making

In this session, the presenters will be covering statistics and sharing videos to drive home points of why and when we search as well as the importance of the search size-up. They will also explain why some searches fail while others are successful. There is no singular mode, rather multiple methods to enhance the survivability for the unprotected occupant. This course is about how we search, when to search and what’s the best way to affect our search, increasing our odds not only to locate a victim but remove them in the most efficient manner.

Speaker:

Sean Duffy
The Rapid Intervention Reality of Your Department

Are the firefighters on your department being properly prepared to function in the rapid intervention role? What should they be doing when assigned and what should be their capabilities? More importantly, does your department’s command and safety officers understand the intricacies and nuances of a rapid intervention team (RIT) deployment on the fireground? Are your members ready to meet the challenge of the important role of the RIT on today’s dynamic fireground? This program will provide the participants with the necessary blueprint to take back to their department to analyze capabilities and update thought processes and training programs needed to meet today’s challenges.

Speaker:

Jeffrey Pindelski
3:00 PM
Fireground Size-Up for the Engine, Ladder and Chief

This seminar is a MUST for every current or future fire officer! This experienced base approach to knowing "when to stay" or "when to go" are the critical factors outlined in this seminar. Situational awareness/fireground size-up, or the lack of it, is a consistent series of factors that leads to the success or failure of an emergency inci-dent. This program is designed to enhance your anticipative skills.

Speaker:

Michael Terpak
Highway Incident Operations for Fire & EMS

The presenters at this session will review case studies and offer defensive strategies for roadway incident scene management. There will also be an overview of the emerging hazards related to semi-autonomous vehicles and the benefits of connected-vehicle technology like digital alerting devices. The presenters will also review the results of a study about emergency lighting use at incident scenes. Attendees will walk away with the essential actions every fire department should be taking to protect their personnel from being struck on the highway and they will also learn about some new technology and equipment to consider for their emergency vehicles to improve scene safety.

Speaker:

Jack Sullivan
Managing Everyday Incidents

As the fire service, we respond to many different types of calls. Some of our responses are adrenaline pumping and mandate vigorous effort, which incorporate the use of several engine, truck and rescue companies operating simultaneously. This class will discuss the less glamorous side of the job, handling the common everyday service calls, which are emergencies for those calling. The fire service is just that: a service. We run more everyday emergencies than the multi-alarm structure fires or MV’s with entrapment. It’s important to know how to properly handle the everyday emergencies to provide the best customer service to the citizens we protect.

Speakers:

John Hayowyk Sean Eagen
Pediatric Rapid-Fire Cases

This session will be a rapid review of common and challenging pediatric case scenarios. Attendees will have the opportunity to expand their experience and knowledge of pediatrics. The format will include pediatric cases followed by multiple choice questions to allow attendees to strengthen their skills and to prompt discussion. Brief explanations will be given after each case to help solidify knowledge.

Speakers:

RIT Operations: Officer Impact and Development

This course will prepare the officer or senior member to deploy, manage and control a rapid intervention team (RIT). The presenter will discuss the reasons maydays occur and correlate lessons learned to NIOSH reports. Attendees will engage in thought-provoking discussions on ways to prepare for the challenges of the fireground. This course is appropriate for all officer experience levels and will include a collaborative discussion facilitated by an experienced RIT instructor.

Speaker:

Say YES to VES

Limited staffing, building construction and recent scientific data are all forcing us to reevaluate methods we have used for decades. Vent Enter Search (VES) is no different. To be the best fire service professionals we can, we must fully understand fire dynamics as they relate to VES. This will allow us to operate as safely as possible while providing the maximum level of proficiency upholding our primary mission—life safety. The course will cover VES history, VES size up, evaluating risk/need for VES, specific step-by-step how-to techniques, and the when and where aspects of VES.

Speaker:

Kevin Lewis
Stretching for Success

The attendees shall be exposed to aspects of “go” and “no-go” situations. During “go” situations, attendees will be given critical knowledge of what it takes to win the fight. Starting with the positioning of the apparatus, size-up, and line selection. A special emphasis will be placed on the pace of the attack, water flow while advancing, and using the reach of your stream inside the structure. Additionally, overcoming difficult stretches and dealing with knee-wall fires will be discussed. Within the modern fire environment, we must throw more water than BTUs being produced. The bottom line is WATER WINS!!

Speaker:

Steve Robertson
The 25 Live: Cancer Prevention Tips to Transform Your Fire Department

In this class, the presenter will discuss "The 25" Live checklist, which was created with the intent of evaluating your current practices, in comparison to the best practices for preventing cancer. Do you wear your SCBA? Use wipes on scene? Switch into backup PPE ASAP? The presenter will examine the list for these and more tips.

Speaker:

Jim Burneka Jr.
Thermal Imaging: Not Just for Overhaul Anymore

This class covers the who, what, when, where, why and how of thermal imaging camera (TIC) usage in the fire service both on the fireground and off. By the end of this course, students will have an understanding on how the imager works, understand how to properly read the information the TIC is giving you, have the knowledge to make informed, educated decisions based on the information from the TIC, and have the understanding and knowledge base to use the camera in the many situations.

Speaker:

Joseph DeVito
Tower Ladders: Setting Up for Success

This program will provide the answer to why we consider the tower ladder both an offensive and defensive tool on the fireground. The basic steps of how to use this tool to its maximum capability will be presented in an organized approach from start to finish. The program will emphasize the importance of getting this apparatus in position early and the advantages it can provide the department throughout the incident. This versatile tool can help provide a safe and efficient platform to work from at various occupancies and buildings located in the suburban setting.

Speaker:

Christopher G. Eysser
Training as the Priority in the Volunteer Fire Service

Making training a priority in volunteer or mostly volunteer fire departments can be a struggle. This can lead to catastrophic results such as an increase in risk for injury and/or death and failing to meet the expectations of the communities they serve. This course will help the firefighter determine the need for training for themselves and their department, and how to make it the leading priority. Topics to be discussed include organizational training needs and expectations, selecting a training officer, training program delivery, and personal responsibility in maintaining a healthy training environment.

Speaker:

Justin Bailey
Urban Water Rescue Considerations

Flooding events are becoming more common in our communities. The 100-year flood has been happening every 3-5 years. Training for the urban environment needs to meet the increasing demand for this type of operation. Rescue teams need to understand the dynamic environment when our streets and towns are turned into raging rivers and lakes. This class will cover operations, scene size up, the rescue sequence, victim contact and assessment, and more. Specific training and planning are keys to a successful operation, the better detailed the preparation, the better chance of having a successful operation.

Speaker:

Andrew McIntyre
3:15 PM
Courage Under Fire Leadership: Being the Best Fire Service Professional You Can Be in 2022 & Beyond!

Leadership does not start at the top — it starts at the firehouse and transitions to the emergency scene! Fire departments around the country, are struggling for quality leadership and followership at all ranks. As a fire service professional in today's fire service, you must possess “Courage Under Fire” and continuously aspire to be the best you can be. Current topics affecting the fire service, events that have occurred as well as personal lessons learned, will be shared and discussed in a positive and productive manner!

Speaker:

Steve Prziborowski
Down & Dirty Urban Forcible Entry

This interactive, forcible-entry program focuses on new and older, but yet safe, street-approved methods and techniques for conventional forcible entry tactics. The presenters will discuss and show techniques for making entry through and around locks, for both residential and commercial structures. Attendees will also learn quick access into urban steel roll gates and how to defeat the locks and locking mechanisms for them. Overcoming street hatches, additional security features like drop bars, slide bolts, burglar bars and modified locks will be covered as well. Attendees will be faced with forcible entry scenarios.

Speakers:

Robert James Cameron Peek
Firefighter Safety: Mistakes & Best Practices

This program looks at a summary of common mistakes and best practices discovered from the presenter’s extensive evaluation of more than 500 near-miss reports and line-of-duty casualty investigations. Improve your understanding of what’s killing firefighters at incident scenes and how to improve fireground safety. During this fast-paced program, the presenter will look at the role of staffing, communications, command activities, size-up, strategy, training, near-miss events and post-incident evaluations play in line-of-duty deaths of firefighters. Attendees will be offered best practices to fix the mistakes.

Speaker:

Richard B. Gasaway
First Due? Then it is Up to YOU!!!

Decisions that are made by the initial incident commander (IC) will dictate how well the rest of the incident will operate. That being said, the initial IC burdens much of the success based on the first few minutes after arrival. This course will aid the fire officer in critical decision making on scene to help bring the situation to a successful conclusion. Topics to be covered include incident priorities and objectives; size-up considerations for both windshield and 360 size-ups; influence of fire behavior on decisions; resource deployment; long-term needs of the incident; and demobilization considerations.

Speaker:

Mike Daley
How Ballistic Research has Impacted Nozzle Selection

The modern fire environment requires a weapons package that can rapidly, safely and efficiently knock down interior fires. In the early to mid-1980s, the law enforcement community went through a similar revolution when they moved from revolvers to semi-automatic pistols due to increasing threats from armed criminals. Research indicated officers required weapons that could fire a greater number of rounds, achieve quicker knockdown via deeper penetration, and lower recoil to manageable levels. The fire service needs similar upgrades when selecting nozzles. Attendees will learn nozzle design history, research parallels with ballistics, modern fire behavior, and nozzle selection to combat increased threats on the fireground.

Speaker:

Jonathan Hall
Is Functional Fitness the Miracle Cure for the Fire Service?

In this seminar, the presenter will talk about all the positive aspects a functional fitness program can bring to the first responder. He will also define "functional" fitness for the firefighter, EMT and medic and how we should be working out as fire rescue athletes. This session will also include some Q&A where attendees will have the opportunity to discuss the fitness trends in the fire service.

Speaker:

Aaron Zamzow
Managing the Multi-alarm

This course will focus on common sense tips for the first-due battalion chief faced with a multi-alarm incident. Topics will include organizing the incident, resource tracking, building an effective command team, instituting the Operations Section and transitioning to a command vehicle, all while maintaining situational awareness. This course will also offer resources for participants to conduct command training at their departments.

Speakers:

Marshall Noyes
Social Media for Today’s Fire Service

This workshop will address how your organization can actively engage your audience using social media during emergency and non-emergency situations. Discussion points will include the most effective social media tools and when to use them. As a seasoned public information officer (PIO), the presenter will share how to use social media to transform public images of your organization and how to communicate with your communities. Anyone responsible for social media, including PIOs, should take this workshop. Anyone who wants to use social media will find the program helpful and will help improve the product you put out.

Speaker:

Robert Reardon
Sudden Cardiac Death and Resuscitation in Pediatrics

The death of a child is always hard to understand, even more so when it is unexpected and sudden. This session will help attendees understand, in a practical way, the most common causes of sudden cardiac death in pediatrics and how to recognize the clinical scenarios. Pediatric resuscitation, from a historical perspective to the latest research, will be presented in a way that is practical and will increase the attendees’ confidence and expertise. Come and learn from one who has studied pediatric sudden cardiac death for 30 years, from the perspective of pediatric electrophysiology as well as an emergency medicine.

Speaker:

Beth Bubolz
Tactical Thermal Imaging: Enhancing Fireground Strategies & Tactics

Firefighters understand the value and the power of the first-due officer's size-up. Those initial actions set the tone for the ultimate outcome of the incident. While few classes include or implement thermal data to enhance the strategies and tactics of the company officer's incident action plan, this course will provide experientially relevant examples of proper thermal data interpretation during the size-up, as the incident progresses, and in several other incident-based scenarios. This course is an overview of a 16-hour Company Officer Program where the presenters explain and demonstrate how building science thermography can be used to improve the overall fireground strategies and tactics.

Speaker:

Andrew Starnes
Tribulation, Tragedy and Triumph: A Close Call, a Double LODD and the Lessons Learned

The Colerain Township Department of Fire and Emergency Medical Services has responded to three similar basement fires in a 13-year period that had three dissimilar results. The first involved a close call when a lieutenant fell into a basement but was able to self-rescue. The second resulted in two line-of-duty deaths when a captain and firefighter both fell into a basement. The third fire had a successful outcome due to the lessons learned from the first two incidents. The presenters of this session examine all three incidents and share the lessons learned.

Speaker:

Allen Walls

Closing Keynote

* Program subject to change